Super rule changes starting 1 July 2022

Increase in Super Guarantee percentage

From 1 July 2022, the percentage rate for the Super Guarantee (SG) increases from 10% to 10.5%. Employers are required to contribute additional money into their employees’ super accounts in line with the higher SG percentage rate.

The SG has been 10% since 1 July 2021 and under the current schedule of legislated increases, the percentage rate will rise again to 11% on 1 July 2023. It will continue rising 0.5% each year until it reaches its final rate of 12% on 1 July 2025.

Removal of the $450 monthly SG threshold

A major change commencing 1 July 2022 is the abolition of the $450 monthly minimum wage threshold to qualify for employer Super Guarantee contributions.

This scrapping of the monthly threshold amount means employers are now required to make super contributions for all their employees (including casual and part-time employees) regardless of how much they earn. The only exceptions are employees aged under 18 and working less than 30 hours per week.

Reduction in eligibility age for downsizer contributions

Following passage of the Treasury Laws Amendment (Enhancing Superannuation Outcomes) Regulations 2022, the eligibility age for making downsizer contributions into super was reduced from 65 years to 60.

From 1 July 2022, more people in their sixties can make contributions (up to $300,000 per person or $600,000 per couple) into their super account using the downsizer measure, provided they meet the eligibility criteria.

Increase in age limit for voluntary super contributions

From 1 July 2022, anyone aged 67 to 74 who wishes to make a non-concessional, voluntary super contribution is no longer required to meet the work test (or work test exemption) to be eligible to make the contribution. The other normal eligibility criteria such as a Total Super Balance (TSB) of less than $1.7 million and sufficient unused annual non-concessional contributions cap still apply.

The only exception is for people wishing to make a personal contribution into their super account and then claiming a tax deduction for the contribution. This type of personal concessional contribution still requires the contributor to meet the work test (or work test exemption).

Spouse contribution age limit increased

In line with the other increases in the contribution age limits, from 1 July 2022 it is possible to make a contribution into your spouse’s super account without you or your spouse needing to meet the requirements of the work test (or work test exemption). The other normal eligibility criteria such as a TSB of less than $1.7 million and sufficient unused annual non-concessional contributions cap still apply.

Increase in age limit for salary-sacrifice contributions

The age limit for making salary-sacrifice contributions into super without needing to meet the work test has also been increased from age 68 to 74. This means from 1 July 2022 eligible salary-sacrifice arrangements into super are available to anyone aged under 75 without the need to meet a work test. The other normal eligibility criteria such as a TSB of less than $1.7 million and sufficient unused annual non-concessional contributions cap still apply.

Increase in age limit for bring-forward rule

Older super fund members who want to make a large non-concessional contribution into their super account can now do so from 1 July 2022, after the Treasury Laws Amendment (Enhancing Superannuation Outcomes) Regulations 2022 became law. The reform lifts the cut-off age for using the bring-forward rule to under 75 from under 67 previously.

This means people up to age 74 can use up to three years’ worth of their non-concessional (after-tax) contribution caps over a shorter period. Eligibility to use the bring-forward rule will still depend on the contributor’s TSB at 30 June of the previous year and the total of personal contributions over the past two financial years.

Temporary reduction in super pension minimum drawdowns
The government has extended the temporary reduction in the minimum drawdown rates by 50% for account-based pensions and similar products in the 2022–23 income year. The temporary reduction also applied to the 2019–20, 2020–21 and 2021-22 financial years.

If you would like to discuss any of these changes with us, please contact our office.